top of page
名称未設定のデザイン - 2023-12-28T132131.687.png

Kagurazaka Street Walk

“Kagurazaka" means "the slope of the gods' music." Kagura refers to the songs and dances performed in dedication to the deities in Japanese Shinto rituals.

 

It is said that the name Kagurazaka originated from the performances of Kagura at nearby shrines such as Wakamiya Hachiman, Ichigaya Hachiman, and Tsukudo Hachiman.

Kagurazaka is located near Edo Castle, established by the Tokugawa shogunate, and boasts a history of over 400 years. Kagurazaka is a hidden gem in Japan, encompassing various elements such as samurai residences, temple towns, entertainment districts, and shopping streets. The rich history of Kagurazaka and its surrounding area, nurtured by various people, has given birth to exquisite traditional crafts and cultural practices.

 

In 1952, the Tokyo French Institute (now Institut Français de Tokyo) was built, receiving French cultural influences and sometimes referred to as Japan's "Montmartre." Subsequently, many foreigners, including the French, moved to Kagurazaka, adding an international flair to its history. Thus, Kagurazaka uniquely blends the best of old traditions with new charms.


Would you like to walk through the charming Kagurazaka with a local guide who has lived in the area for about a quarter of a century? We will take you to Kagurazaka and Tokyo's history, wonderful places, and delicious shops that only locals know about.
 

Check Availability

Yarai Noh Theater

Yarai Noh Theater(Only if the inside is open for viewing)

The Kanze Kyukokai, a public interest incorporated association, owns the Yarai Noh Theater. Constructed in 1952, its current stage and building make it one of the oldest Noh theaters in Tokyo, following the stage of the Okura School of Kyogen and the Yamamoto family in Suginami Ward. It is registered as a tangible cultural property of Japan.

AKOMEYA TOKYO in la kagū

AKOMEYA TOKYO in la kagū

AKOMEYA TOKYO in la kagū is a commercial facility renovated by the architect Kengo Kuma from the warehouse of Shinchosha Publishing Co. It sells a variety of high-quality items including rice, dashi, seasonings, baked sweets, and cooking tools, all created with a commitment to authenticity. The store also offers household goods and clothing, making it an ideal spot for souvenirs from your trip to Japan.

Akagi Shrine

Akagi Shrine

Akagi Shrine was founded in Ushigome Waseda by Ohgo Hikotaro Shigeharu, who migrated from the foot of Mount Akagi (in Gunma Prefecture) in 1300. It was then relocated to its current location in 1555. During the Edo period, it was designated as one of the Edo Great Shrines by the Tokugawa shogunate and garnered reverence as the guardian deity of Ushigome. The current shrine pavilion, completed in 2010, was designed under the supervision of architect Kengo Kuma.

Bishamonten (Zenkoku-ji Temple)

Bishamonten (Zenkoku-ji Temple)

Bishamonten (Zenkoku-ji Temple) was established in 1595 in Nihonbashi Bakurocho under the order of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first shogun of the Edo shogunate, to protect the nation. After several fires, it was later relocated to Kagurazaka. Since the late Edo period, Zenkoku-ji has been popularly known as 'Kagurazaka's Bishamonten.' The prosperity of Kagurazaka, known as 'Yamanote Ginza' from the Meiji to the Taisho era, developed as the temple's front town. It is said that the tradition of night markets during festival days in Tokyo originated with Bishamonten.

Stone-paved Alley

Stone-paved Alley

The cobblestone paths named 'Hyogo Yokocho Alley' and 'Kakurenbo Yokocho Alley' have become one of the defining landscapes of Kagurazaka. It is said that these cobblestones were gradually laid down since the area, which was not damaged in the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, became known as 'Yamanote Ginza' and experienced great popularity. The cobblestones were installed to prevent kimono-clad geisha from staining their attire with mud while walking on dirt paths, especially on rainy days. The paving of the alleys with auspicious fan patterns in the cobblestones was done in the hope of further prosperity for the geisha district.

Tsukudo Hachiman Shrine

Tsukudo Hachiman Shrine

Tsukudo Hachiman Shrine is an ancient shrine, believed to have been established about 1200 years ago. It is said that the statue of Amitabha Buddha enshrined in a small shrine here was carved by Saicho, known as Dengyo Daishi. The shrine got its name, Tsukudo Hachiman, because it was built on the soil brought from Usa Shrine in Tsukushi (Oita Prefecture). The Koshin Tower, erected in 1664, is exceptionally rare, featuring two monkeys. Additionally, the stone torii gate, donated in 1726, is the oldest in Shinjuku Ward. While the shrine is a cherry blossom spot in spring, its relative obscurity allows for peaceful cherry blossom viewing.

Eating Your Way Around  In Kagurazaka

Eating Your Way Around

In Kagurazaka, a variety of snacks are sold, allowing visitors to enjoy eating while strolling around. You can savor unique and delicious foods only found in Kagurazaka, including traditional Japanese sweets, donuts, tofu desserts, Peko-chan yaki, various other sweets, as well as delicatessen items like croquettes and menchi-katsu from meat shops. However, please note that the cost of snacks is not included in the tour fee.

Canal Cafe

Canal Cafe

If you're tired from strolling around Kagurazaka, why not take a break at 'Canal Café'? 'Canal Café' is a floating restaurant and café on the outer moat of Edo Castle. Its open space by the water makes you forget you're in the heart of the city. Located near JR Iidabashi Station, you can frequently see trains on the Sobu and Chuo lines. You can also row boats on the moat. Along the moat, there are cherry trees, making it a prime spot for cherry blossom viewing. Thus, during the cherry blossom season, 'Canal Café' gets extremely crowded.

Atami yu

Atami-yu (Public Bath)

Atami-yu is a traditional public bathhouse that opened in 1973. It was once visited by as many as 1,000 people a day, including geisha. The paintings of Mount Fuji and carp inside Atami-yu are worth seeing. It's the perfect bathhouse to wash off your sweat after a walk around Kagurazaka. They also rent towels for a fee, making it easy for anyone to enjoy the bathhouse experience.

Institut français de Tokyo

Institut français de Tokyo

The Institut français de Tokyo was established in 1952. At the Institut français de Tokyo, French language classes are offered, as well as events such as movies and exhibitions. The establishment of the Institute has led to many French people living in Kagurazaka. Due to its French cultural influence and the similarity of its slopes, Kagurazaka is sometimes referred to as the "Montmartre of Japan". The Tokyo Franco-Japanese Institute was designed by Junzo Itakura, an architect who was a disciple of Le Corbusier.

Remains of Ushigome Gate

Remains of Ushigome Gate

The Ushigome Gate, located in the outer moat of Edo Castle, was constructed in 1636. Seeing the remains of the gate (stone walls) today, one can understand it was a massive structure. The name of the gate originated from its function as an exit toward the Ushigome area. From the side of Edo Castle, passing through the Ushigome Gate and going northwest leads to Kagurazaka. Ushigome Gate and Kagurazaka are also depicted in the ukiyo-e woodblock prints by Utagawa Hiroshige. Hiroshige was a famous ukiyo-e artist who influenced Western painters such as Van Gogh and Monet.

Tokyo Daijingu

Tokyo Daijingu

Tokyo Daijingu's origin lies in the Hibiya consecration of the Naiku (Inner Shrine) of Ise Jingu in 1880. A 'remote worship hall', as its name implies, is a building for worshiping from afar. Today's Tokyo Daijingu, known as 'Tokyo's Ise-sama', displays a signboard to this effect and has become a popular moniker. The style of wedding ceremonies conducted in front of the deity today, known as 'Shinzen-shiki', originated at Tokyo Daijingu. Tokyo Daijingu, as a shrine for matchmaking, attracts many visitors, especially young women.

Kagurazaka Street Walk
Tour Information

Meeting point

Tokyo Metro Tozai Line, Kagurazaka (T05) Station, Exit 1b

Tour Duration

Approximately 2 hours. The meeting and dispersal times will be decided after consulting with the customer.

Accessibility

Everyone is welcome to participate. Of course, children who can walk are also welcome to join, accompanied by a parent. Using a stroller is no problem. Wheelchair users can participate as well. However, please note that there are some places, such as stairs, that may not be accessible for strollers or wheelchair users.

Kagurazaka Street Walk Tour

After making a reservation, our staff will contact you within 3 days. For the Kagurazaka Street Walk Tour, we would like to hear about your interests beforehand and ask you to provide a brief overview of the places you wish to visit during this tour. Based on your preferences, our staff will create an itinerary for you. The tourist spots plotted on the map represent iconic locations around Kagurazaka. Unless you have specific requests, we will focus the walking tour around these spots.

Check Availability

Would you like to walk through the charming Kagurazaka with a local guide who has lived in the area for about a quarter of a century? We will take you to Kagurazaka, where history, wonderful places, and delicious shops known only to locals await you.

bottom of page